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      Watch design trends are not particularly fast moving – or they usually aren’t. The renewed interest in mechanical calibres is decades old. And the desire for smaller watch cases is at least fve or six years old, with 40/41mm the current sweet spot – far larger than vintage watches of the ’50s and ’60s, of course, but tiny compared to the behemoths of the last couple of decades.
      Both of these – as well as smaller micro trends, like blue dials or three hand faces – are all part of a larger trend, however, one that says ‘away with the bling’ and concentrates on more of a back-to-basics, honest craftsmanship type approach. These days watchmaking – like much of the wider culture – seems obsessed with the authentic, the analogue and the ruggedly individual, and over the last half-decade, in particular, this has manifested itself in two new ways. One is the fresh enthusiasm for retro, vintage-style design, and the other is the seemingly unstoppable march of bronze.
      “When we launched our frst bronze cased watch last year, it was a version of our best-selling C60 Trident,” says CW co-founder Mike France. “And though we hoped and believed it would do quite well, it was really something of an interesting experiment. We were totally unprepared, certainly, for just how quickly it took off. And if bronze was hot back then, it’s become even hotter since. The use of bronze for watch cases is a trend that shows no signs of stopping any time soon – or even of slowing down.” Bronze is, of course, an alloy of copper and tin – usually around 12% tin, occasionally with small amounts of other metals (from aluminium to zinc, nickel to manganese) mixed in. It was frst created six or seven  thousand years ago, gave its name to The Bronze Age in the Near East (and, later, Europe) in the three millennia before Christ, and has been used for statues and weapons, mirrors and coins, music instruments and ship fttings. Until very recently, though, it was never used for watches.
      Part of the reason, of course, is to do with its intrinsic qualities. It’s a little more brittle than stainless steel, and a little heavier, but the main difference is that it rapidly takes on a vintage-like matte patina on exposure to moisture (not necessarily buckets of water, but just the stuff it absorbs from the atmosphere and your skin). This protects it from corroding beautifully – hence its use on ship propellors and the like – but gives each example a unique, ever-changing mottled appearance over time. This was a look that held little appeal to many in the past, but seems thrillingly personal, old-school and honest now.

      The frst bronze luxury watch is generally considered to be Gérald Genta’s Gefca of 1988, and it took a while for the idea to catch on. Initially its use was limited to expensive, low-run models from the more risk-taking and smaller-scale end of the luxury watch spectrum, but over the last couple of years – and particularly with the launch of what’s rapidly growing into an extensive Christopher Ward Bronze Collection – things have been changing at quite a pace.
      “Bronze watches are a perfect example of the low key, keeping-it-real aesthetic so many of us embrace these days,” Mike says. “And the way they develop a patina with age is endlessly fascinating. It gives them an individual edge few things can match. People tell us that their bronze Tridents have become their most treasured watches, and a big reason why is that your watch becomes unique to you.”
      With the immediate success of the frst bronze Tridents, then, Christopher Ward wasted no time in widening the range to four. That the bronze case should now be made in both Trident sizes – the regular, fairly large 43mm case and the more modest and versatile 38mm – was something of a no-brainer, but then came a rather more radical thought. Why not offer each of these in two versions?
      One would be ‘raw’, with the bronze unmarked and untouched, ready to develop its own unique patina on the owner’s wrist, and the other would be pre-patinated, so the wearer wouldn’t have to wait weeks or months to enjoy the full extent of bronze’s unique oxidising properties. “Achieving this meant experimenting endlessly with the properties of bronze,” says senior designer Adrian Buchmann, “but we eventually came up with a new process to oxidise the surface at high speed, quickly ageing the copper in the metal to bring out the blackness.
      We experimented with pre-aging the cases before constructing the watches, and how long we should pre-age them for – it was all a bit of an adventure – until we arrived at the process that seemed best. We now force-age the complete watch – so the matching buckle enjoys the same process, and it’s only the exterior of the bronze case that starts to oxidise, not the inner surfaces – and we only do it long enough to get the process going, not so much that it goes very dark and doesn’t allow the owner to add their own patina through use.”
      Though how quickly a bronze watch case will change colour depends very much on your skin type and where you live – hot, humid Singapore versus cold, dry Norway, say – these watches now come to their owners with something like four months worth of wear already ‘built in’. “Right now we’re probably selling around 30% of our bronze watches patinated, and the rest in their raw, untouched state,” Mike says. “And the plan is to offer both options with every bronze watch we sell from now on.”
      The C60 Trident Bronze Pro 600s are an open series, but their success has seen Christopher Ward start to offer a number of additional new bronze models, all dive watches of one type or another, and all on limited edition runs. “Even so,” says Mike, “we now offer perhaps the widest, most cohesive Bronze Collection available anywhere, with additional models being considered all the time.”
      Next up, for instance, is the striking C60 Trident Bronze Ombré COSC Limited Edition, which answers a new question that few had thought about before bronze became so popular. With the case developing such an interesting patina, a striking contrast between that and the pristine face beneath the sapphire crystal starts to develop. For many that’s interesting and enjoyable, but what if you wanted a watch where the collar and cuffs match, so to speak, and the face has the same aged look as the rest of the case?
      The answer is the Ombré COSC LE, which achieves its more unifed feel through a specially made dial, which is painted and then hand scratched – so no two are the same, just as no two cases will be – and gives you perhaps the ultimate in bronze individuality. “We’re bringing the outside inside, if you like,” says Adrian, “and it took quite a bit of experimentation to get to the perfect solution for this. The results, though, are extremely striking – while remaining resolutely anti-bling. In fact, this is perhaps the most individual watch of all, as both your dial and your case are unique. Only a handful of watch brands – Zenith and Anonimo spring to mind – have experimented with anything similar, so you’re almost certain to never see another watch like this.”
      But that’s not all. Already available are a couple of other bronze models too. The C60 Trident Bronze GMT 600 Limited Edition runs an ETA 2893-2 movement, and marks the frst time we’ve seen a GMT complication in a bronze watch case. Interest in this particular watch is sky high, we’re told, and it looks likely to be another that will sell out rather quickly. “It’s particularly good looking, with the GMT hand in a nice light blue, which contrasts brilliantly with the bronze,” says Adrian. “It looks great on a leather or canvas strap, and comes in at £995, great value for a GMT.”
      And then there’s the last of the Bronze Collection so far, the C65 Trident Bronze SH21 Limited Edition. This one’s been so popular, every one of the 150 made has already been snapped up, so finding one will be like hunting for hen’s teeth. “This is a very special watch, with a special look – not just the bronze case, but the fact that it has a small seconds subdial at 6 o’clock, unique amongst C65s,” says Mike. “It’s also the first  C65 Trident Diver to run our in-house SH21 movement. Even so, though, we were surprised it sold out quite as quickly as it did. I suppose that, in retrospect, the triple whammy of the bronze case, the winning C65 aesthetic and it being a limited edition should have given us a clue!”

      So what is the future for bronze watches? Interest is still on the up, it seems, and part of the appeal is that this metal looks so different to  anything else, and yet – unlike gold or platinum, or even something like ceramic – doesn’t cost too much more than regular stainless steel. Plus, of course, it suits today’s authentic vibe brilliantly. “We’re always interested in new case materials,” says Mike, “but not since titanium has anything seemed to work this well for watches. In fact, I think bronze has an even wider appeal.”
      It must have some sort of downside, though, surely…? “Only that it seems to suit the more rugged, outdoorsy watches best. That’s why it works so well on Tridents, and why we haven’t yet attempted a bronze dress watch. For one thing, it would risk making your white dress shirt cuffs go green.” A minor issue, then, and easily fixed by a wardrobe of dark-coloured shirts. And anyway, small idiosyncrasies are all part of the appeal of bronze. These are not watches designed to be all things to all men – far from it – but instead to have a striking, unusual, inherently casual and highly personal allure. A bronze Trident – whatever the model – is a Trident that’s unique to you.
      Source: Loupe Magazine - Issue 11 - Winter 2018

    • Admin
      The C1 Grand Malvern Worldtimer marks the moment Christopher Ward ‘completes the set’ of premium dress watch models using the dynamic C1 case; it also offers some of the greatest value in the wristwatch world.
      In the frst issue of Loupe we ran a piece on the C9 Worldtimer, which saw the frst – and, to date, only – use of the JJ03 Worldtimer module,  developed by master watchmaker Johannes Jahnke to work with an ETA 2893 movement. It was a striking piece, and amazing value, but not a conventional watch.
      Well, now JJ03 is back, powering that watch’s replacement, the C1 Grand Malvern Worldtimer. This is the last of the company’s premium dress watches to move from the old C9 case to the 43mm version of the more sophisticated C1 Grand Malvern case – but the innovations don’t end there. “We called the old C9 model a ‘Worldtimer’, but it was really more of an unusual, innovative, but – to many people – slightly hard-to-use GMT watch,” says company co-founder Mike France. “A GMT watch gives you the time in two zones simultaneously, but a true Worldtimer lets you see what time it is everywhere in the world at once. And this new watch is very much a Worldtimer.”
      On the old one, if you remember, the top of the dial displayed airport codes rather than full city names – LHR for London Heathrow, for instance – which corresponded to red dots on the world map in the centre of the dial. The hour hand was set to 24-hour mode too, meaning it went around the dial once a day, rather than the traditional twice. On the new watch, however, the cities disc features the full names, the map in the centre has changed to a projection centred on the North Pole – and the hour hand works the traditional way, on a easier to comprehend 12-hour cycle. An orange ‘city indicator’ on the dial makes it easy to pick out a favoured time zone – Paris, say – wherever you are in the world.
      Worldtimers are, by their nature, ‘busy’ watches, cramming lots of information into a small space. The basic idea is that you can see at a glance the time – and, indeed, day or night status – in each of the world’s 24 major, whole-hour time zones. There are two rings on the outside of the dial: a 24- hour ring with the numbers 1-24 on it, their colouring indicating daylight or nocturnal hours, and a wider cities ring on the very edge of the dial, each city representing one of the 24 main time zones. Use of the worldtimer function is straightforward: line your local time up against your current city using the 24-hour GMT ring, and you can see what time it is anywhere else in the world within the same glance..
      Although affordable Worldtimers are a relatively recent proposition, the concept has been around for ages. Take the ‘World Time’ Bonbonnière, for instance. It was made in about 1790, is attributed to Pierre Morand, and has the names of 53 different locations engraved around a 24-hour dial.
      It was in the early 1930s, though, nearly half a century after Greenwich (London) was established as the prime meridian of the world’s 24 main time zones (and when air travel was becoming established), that Swiss watchmaker Louis Cottier created the frst mechanism to display them all on a single dial. He’d eventually help many of the major brands of the time develop Worldtimers, such as Vacheron Constantin, which, by the end of the ’30s, had produced the frst Worldtimer as a pocket watch, and Patek Philippe, which created the frst Worldtimer wristwatch.
      Not so long ago, the only Worldtimers you could buy were incredibly expensive watches, created by just a handful of the very high end brands, but in recent years an increasing number of companies have introduced their versions of these watches. £5,000 is considered remarkable value for any watch offering this functionality, yet the C1 Grand Malvern Worldtimer combines an in-house complication with attractive design, great legibility, and topnotch detailing, all at a ffth of the price. That this elegant watch, more usable than its predecessor, can be had for under £1,000 makes it 2018’s biggest steal.
      The C1 Grand Malvern Worldtimer is launched in early November, £995
       

    • Admin
      £730 - £795
      Celebrated for its anti-corrosive qualities and exceptional performance in a variety of conditions, using 316L stainless steel is a natural choice for many watchmakers. As a tribute, the bezel of this limited edition Trident – of which 316 were made, obviously – is made from this indefatigable marine-grade alloy.
      Description
      Without a doubt, the C60 Trident 316L Limited Edition will make an immediate impression. Our most extravagant looking Trident yet, its unidirectional bezel – constructed from the 316L alloy that gives the watch its name – contrasts beautifully against the vivid orange hue of its matte dial.
      Matching its flamboyant visuals with outstanding technicality, the 316L has the high-end specifications and robust build quality you’d expect of a Trident. Like the bezel, its 43mm case is made of marine-grade stainless steel, while also being water-resistant to a depth of 600m. Other hallmarks of our best selling dive range – the Trident on the seconds hand counterbalance, and deep-stamped into its backplate – make their customary appearance.
      Limited to 316 pieces, the C60 Trident 316L LE will stand out proudly in any collection.

      Movement
      With 26 jewels and an anti-shock system (necessary for ensuring smooth timekeeping throughout everyday use), the Sellita SW200-1 is an industry-revered movement. Dependable and accurate, it features a self-winding mechanism and a 38 hour power reserve, while a date wheel sits at 3 o’clock.
      Boasting a classic frequency of 28,800 vibrations per hour (that’s eight ticks a second), the SW200-1 powers the C60 Trident 316L Limited Edition with supreme precision.
      Technical
      Diameter: 43mm Height: 13.3mm Weight: 102g Calibre: Sellita SW200-1 Case: 316L stainless steel Water resistance: 60 ATM (600 metres) Vibrations: 28,800 per hour (4Hz) Timing tolerance: +/- 20 seconds per day Lug to lug: 51.5mm Strap: 22mm Features
      Swiss made Limited edition of 316 pieces 26 jewel self-winding mechanical movement 38 hour power reserve Date calendar Central hacking seconds Anti-shock system Screw-in crown Unidirectional brushed steel (316L) bezel 3.4mm anti-reflective sapphire crystal Matte finish dial Super-Luminova dial, indexes and hands Signature Trident counterbalance on seconds handScrew-down deep-stamped 3D backplate Soft-touch leather strap with engraved dress clasp Unique, engraved serial number

    • Admin
      Celebrated for its anti-corrosive qualities and exceptional performance in a variety of conditions, 316L stainless steel is a natural choice for many watchmakers. As a tribute, the bezel of this limited edition Trident – of which 316 were made, obviously – is made from this indefatigable marine-grade alloy.
      Description
      After the success of the original C60 Trident 316L Limited Edition, it was only a matter of time until another entry was made to a collection that celebrates the robust and aesthetic qualities of stainless steel.
      A colour long requested by customers, this new limited edition’s matte dial is a rich shade of blue – fitting for a watch at home in all aquatic conditions. Five minute markers and our unique Trident second hand counterbalance have been finished in orange, providing excellent legibility, whilst lending this watch its own distinctive character. A unidirectional stainless steel bezel – the feature that gives the 316L its title – encompasses the dial boldly.
      Matching its stylish visuals with outstanding technical quality, the 316L has the high-end specifications and robust build quality you’d expect of a Trident. Like the bezel, its 43mm case is made of marine-grade stainless steel, while also being water-resistant to a depth of 600m. Other hallmarks of our best selling dive range – the Trident motif deep-stamped into its backplate, and characteristic hour and minute hands – make their customary appearance.
      Limited exclusively to 316 pieces, the C60 Trident 316L will stand out proudly in any collection.

      Movement
      With 26 jewels and an anti-shock system (necessary for ensuring smooth timekeeping throughout everyday use), the Sellita SW200-1 is an industry-revered movement. Dependable and accurate, it features a self-winding mechanism and a 38 hour power reserve, while a date wheel sits at 3 o’clock.
      Boasting a classic frequency of 28,800 vibrations per hour (that’s eight ticks a second), the SW200-1 powers the C60 Trident 316L Limited Edition with supreme precision.
      Technical
      Diameter: 43mm Height: 13.3mm Weight: 102g Calibre: Sellita SW200-1 Case: 316L stainless steel Water resistance: 60 ATM (600 metres) Vibrations: 28,800 per hour (4Hz) Timing tolerance: +/- 20 seconds per day Lug to lug: 51.5mm Strap colour: Blue Strap width: 22mm Features
      Swiss made Limited edition of 316 pieces 26 jewel self-winding mechanical movement 38 hour power reserve Date calendar Central hacking seconds Anti-shock system Screw-in crown Unidirectional brushed steel (316L) bezel 3.4mm anti-reflective sapphire crystal Matte finish blue dial SuperLuminova dial, indexes and hands Signature Trident counter-balance on seconds hand Screw-down deep-stamped 3D backplate Unique, engraved serial number Premium quality canvas webbing strap with CW twin flag logo Luxury presentation case and owner’s handbook Released November 2017  
       

    • Admin
      £2,995
      C07-42HPR1-SD0K0-LK
      A 50-piece limited edition motorsport watch engineered to mark the fifth anniversary of our in-house movement Calibre SH21's first prototype, the C7 Apex is not a normal Christopher Ward release. Bold and futuristic, its stripped back aesthetic gives a hand-wound version of our in-house chronometer the celebratory showcase it deserves.
      Description
      In this 50-piece limited edition, Christopher Ward has discovered its apex; not just the pinnacle of its design and engineering capabilities, but a motorsport watch that leads the competition through genuine innovation and spectacle.

      Housed within our motorsport collection's four-piece case design - constructed from sandblasted and matte finished steel, with a grey DLC (diamond-like carbon) coated steel band around its centre - it's about the only recognisable element the Apex shares with the remainder of the CW Collection. For the Apex's dial is a fusion of texture, depth, shadow and colour that channels an aesthetic similar to that of a concept car. Stripped back, but not minimalist; there is a wealth of detailing to admire. Most notable is a red skeletonised bridge - the Apex's power reserve hand is mounted on here -while adjacent is a raised speedometer-influenced indicator finished in a combination of red, black and steel detailing.

      Elsewhere, a ruthenium-coated plate has been cut away to reveal glimpses of the movement underneath - most prominently in its centre, where Calibre SH21's hour wheel is wholly visible for the first time. Ruthenium, a rare element found in the platinum group of the periodic table, provided just the right brushed look required to compliment the remainder of the dial. Both the Apex's hands and a recessed outer ring have been filled with white SuperLumiNova®; in the case of the latter, intersecting five-minute markers ensure ease of reading in low-light conditions, their polished surfaces bearing a strong similarity to a car's alloy wheels.

      There has never been a CW like this before; and for the fifth anniversary of our ground-breaking in-house movement, that's exactly what Calibre SH21 deserves.

      Movement
      Although creating a chronometer-certified movement with a 120 hour power reserve is a fantastic achievement in itself, the arrival of Calibre SH21's first physical prototype represented so much more than that. In an industry where ETA was slowly restricting the supply of movements to anyone outside of its inner circle, a small British brand wasn't supposed to be able to manufacture its own in-house calibre. Yet, in that moment, Christopher Ward had become the master of its own destiny.

      In the five years that have since passed, Calibre SH21's decoration has been tailored on multiple occasions to reflect the watches it has appeared in. In the case of the futuristic Apex, it becomes clear that this hand-wound version of SH21, like any concept car, has been built to showcase the possibility of what there is to come. But beyond aesthetics, it's the approach to design that sets the Apex apart: as its movement and dial were planned in unison, it shares the same red bridge (two this time, one for each of Calibre SH21's barrels); the same vertically brushed ruthenium; and, much like the minute wheel visible through the dial, both of SH21's mainsprings have been revealed.

      And while most of the focus has been on SH21's aesthetic makeover, let's reaffirm the figures that caused such incredulity when our in-house chronometer was first unveiled: tested in a variety of positions and temperatures by the Geneva-based Contrôle Officiel Suisse des Chronomètres, the C7 Apex Limited Edition sits in the top 6% of all Swiss-made watches for accuracy, while its 120-hour power reserve ensures you can take off the C7 Apex on Friday evening and still have a couple of days' chronometer-certified timekeeping left come Monday. With its refined bridge and exposed internal workings, Calibre SH21 is engineering at its most beautiful.

      Technical
      Diameter: 42mm Height: 13.15mm Weight: 71g Calibre: Calibre SH21 - hand-wound with power reserve complication Case: 316L stainless steel Water resistance: 10 ATM (100 metres) Frequency: 28,800 per hour Timing tolerance: -4/+6 seconds per day Dial colours: Grey/Ruthenium/Red Lume: SuperLumiNova® SLN-T-C1 Strap width: 22mm Strap colour: Black/red Lug to Lug: 48.2mm Features
      Limited Edition of 50 pieces Swiss made 33 jewel hand-wound chronometer with power reserve complication 120 hour power reserve Hour, minute, central seconds, date Grey diamond-like-carbon (DLC)-coated & sandblasted marine-grade stainless steel four-piece case Semi-open dial with circular brushed Ruthenium ring, engraved Ruthenium plate and red anodised aluminium bridge Bevelled matte black outer ring with grey minute markers, intersected with polished and bevelled rhodium five-minute markers Lower ring area filled with T-C1 SuperLumiNova® (blue emission) Matte black power reserve indicator ring with red numerals and circular brushed ruthenium outer ring Altimeter-inspired date wheel Push-down crown with twin flag engraving Anti-reflective domed sapphire crystal Multi-faceted hour and minute hands filled with SuperLumiNova® Exhibition backplate with unique engraved serial number  

    • Admin
      For those who missed out on the previous renditions of our popular C60 Trident Day Date COSC series, it may be time to take the dive with this new 250-piece limited edition chronometer. Powered by a Swiss-made ETA 2836 movement, and bearing an exciting blue, orange and black colour scheme, the C60 Trident Acan COSC Limited Edition dares to be different.
      Description
      Following the success of the Trident Day Date COSC releases before it, this 250-piece limited edition continues to blend modern dive watch looks with the technicality of its Swiss-made chronometer movement - although this time it's decorated in an eye-catching triumvirate of blue, orange and black.

      If you pull your eyes away from the Acan's glossy zirconia ceramic bezel, a matte blue dial offers a bold foundation upon which a dashing of colour and texture has been applied. Both our customary Trident-shaped counterbalance and printed five minute markers are present in orange, while the applied indexes and window framing the dial's day and date wheels have been tastefully polished.

      As part of the Trident family, legibility and reliability are guaranteed. Its indexes and hands are deep-filled with SuperLumiNova® SLN T C1 for excellent luminosity, while its marine-grade stainless steel case and sapphire crystal ensures the Acan will continue to perform down to depths of 600m. With a chronometer-certified ETA 2836 movement complete with anti-shock system inside, the C60 Trident Acan COSC Limited Edition's dynamic appearance and robust build quality will cause waves just about anywhere.
      Movement
      Using the ubiquitous ETA 2824 as its basis, the 2836-2 COSC adds a day wheel mechanism to complement its date function. 

      Just as importantly, each 2836-2 COSC calibre has been certified by the independent Contrôle Officiel Suisse des Chronomètres, making it about as accurate as a mechanical movement can be.

      To achieve 'chronometer' status, the movement must be accurate to within at least -4/+6 seconds per day in different positions and temperatures. 

      That only six per cent of all Swiss movements are COSC-certified tells you how special this movement is.










    • Admin
      When you think about it, the essence of motorsport is very simple: coming first, whatever the cost. But let’s be honest: the best drivers to uncork champagne from the top of the podium are the ones who did so with style; the ones who ignored radio orders to let somebody overtake; in other words, the ones who dared to be different.
      The C7 Rapide Day Date COSC shares that exact same philosophy. With its matte black case and dial, its design is a reaction to the brightly coloured motorsport watches atypical of the industry. Instead, it’s a stealthy supercar of a watch, with the aerodynamic curve of its lugs highlighted against a racing stripe-inspired red aluminium band. Speedometer-inspired second hand and the first ten minutes of its outer track are finished in the same colour, providing distinctive contrast whilst also being – there’s no other word for it – cool.
      Like any Constructor’s team challenging for the Championship, precision and power sit at the heart of Formula 1. That’s why the ETA 2836 movement inside the Day Date is chronometer-certified, placing it within the top 6% of Swiss watches for accuracy. And for those wild weekends after a podium place finish in Monaco, its day date complication will help you to reacclimatise when you wake up on an unfamiliar-looking yacht.
      Beautiful inside and out, the C7 Rapide Day Date is the dark horse of our motorsport collection. And like many sought-after classic sports cars, its limited edition status (only 100 have been made) means you’re the owner of something truly special.
      Features
      Swiss made Limited edition of 100 pieces 25 jewel self-winding chronometer movement Hour, minute, central seconds, day date function Black DLC coated 316L stainless steel and red aluminium four-piece case Black anodised aluminium bezel with 5 minute markers Anti-reflective flat sapphire crystal SuperLuminova® indexes Day date window with black disc Screw-in crown Deep-stamped screw-down backplate with unique engraved serial number Technical
      Diameter: 42mm Height: 11.15mm Weight: 71g Calibre: ETA 2836 COSC Case: DLC coated steel and aluminium Water Resistance: 10 ATM (100 metres) Vibrations: 28,800 per hour (4 Hz) Timing Tolerance: -4/+6 seconds per day Lug to lug: 48.2mm Strap: 22mm  








    • Admin
      A dual-time automatic timepiece for world travellers with a water-restance of 600m, the Trident C60 GMT 600 is tough, reliable and beautiful. Dive with it, travel with it – it’ll become your trusted companion.
      Description
      A completely refreshed version of our dual-time automatic timepiece, the Trident C60 GMT 600 is ideal for style-conscious world travellers.
      The re-engineered 316L marine-grade stainless steel case now incorporates a zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic unidirectional bezel for incredible scratch resistance, while the watch is water-resistant to 600 metres (2,000ft).
      A new crown, indexes and enhanced luminosity add to the usability, while the back-plate boasts a deep-stamped Trident motif.
      With the supremely accurate ETA 2893-2 automatic movement beating at its core, the C60 Trident GMT 600 is one of the best GMTs around. Now, where’s that plane?
      Movement
      This fine ETA calibre (‘calibre’ is the fancy word in the watch industry describing a movement) with dual-time functionality allows for the time to be told in two time zones simultaneously – hence its use on ‘GMT’ watches.
      When fully wound, it delivers 42 hours of continuous power, while vibrating at a rate of eight times per second (28,800 times an hour).
      This frequency allows for excellent accuracy when regulated by a Christopher Ward expert.
      Technical
      Diameter: 43mm Height: 13.70mm Case weight: 105g Calibre: ETA 2893-2 Vibrations: 28,800 per hour Timing tolerance: +20/-20 seconds per day Case: 316L Stainless steel Water resistance: 60 bar Bezel: Zirconia dioxide ceramic Dial Colour: Black Lume: SuperLuminova SLN-T-C1 Strap width: 22mm Strap length:124mm x 82mm Lug to Lug: 51.5mm Features
      Swiss made 21 Jewel self-winding mechanical movement 42 hour power reserve Dual-time GMT function Date calendar Central hacking seconds Anti-shock system 43mm marine grade, stainless steel case Uni-directional ceramic bezel Screw-down deep-stamped 3D back plate Screw-in crown Unique engraved serial number 3.4mm anti-reflective sapphire crystal SuperLuminova indices, bezel marker and hands Guilloche wave pattern dial Signature Trident counter-balance Embossed alligator pattern Italian leather strap with CW motif buckle Luxury presentation case and owner’s handbook  













    • Admin
      Our best-selling watch has had an incredible upgrade. Re-engineered with a stainless steel case and scratch-resistant bezel, it’s a classic diving watch with ground-breaking technical capabilities.
      Description
      Our best-selling watch has had a comprehensive upgrade.
      The re-engineered 316L marine-grade stainless steel case now incorporates a zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic unidirectional bezel for scratch resistance, while the watch is watertight at depths of up to 600 metres (2,000ft) – twice that of its predecessor.
      The dial retains the guilloche wave pattern of the first Tridents but the new indexes are now deep-filled with SuperLuminova SLN T C1 for additional luminosity.
      The all-new crown is easier to use, while the backplate has the Trident motif deep-stamped and prominent. And if the self-winding movement is the same it’s only because there’s no better available mechanism for this watch.
      The new Trident: better than ever.
      Movement
      The ETA 2824-2 and/or the Sellita SW200-1 (identical apart from an additional 26th jewel) self-winding mechanical movements are the most common in fine watchmaking.
      A solid construction, including a strong mainspring, makes them reliable and robust, with both boasting a classic frequency of 28,800 vibrations per hour (that’s eight ticks per second).
      They’re also excellent timekeepers.
      Technical
      Diameter: 43mm Height: 13.30mm Case weight: 108g Calibre: ETA 2824-2/Sellita SW200-1 Vibrations: 28,800 per hour Timing tolerance: +20/-20 seconds per day Case: 316L Stainless steel Water resistance: 60 bar Bezel: Zirconia dioxide ceramic Dial Colour: White Lume: SuperLuminova SLN-T-C1 Strap width: 22mm Strap length: 124mm x 82xmm Lug to Lug: 51.5mm Features
      Swiss made Self-winding mechanical movement 38 hour power reserve Date calendar Central hacking seconds Anti-shock system 43mm marine grade, stainless steel case Uni-directional ceramic bezel Water resistant to 600m/2000ft Screw-down deep-stamped 3D back plate Screw-in crown Unique engraved serial number 3.4mm anti-reflective sapphire crystal SuperLuminova indices, bezel marker and hands Guilloche wave pattern dial Signature Trident counter-balance Embossed alligator pattern Italian leather strap with Bader deployment Luxury presentation case and owner’s handbook  













    • Admin
      The C60 Trident Chronograph is a watch created for diving professionals that non-submariners will covet every bit as much. Water-resistant to 600m and boasting a helium release valve, it’s the ultimate diving timepiece.
      Description
      The C60 Trident Chronograph is a watch created for diving professionals that non-submariners will covet just as much.
      The navy and metallic-yellow dial catches the eye immediately, as does the 60-seconds sub-dial which ‘breathes’ via a rotating disc behind a cut-out for easy reading.
      The uni-directional ceramic bezel has a better defined font for the numerals, which is filled with SuperLuminova for outstanding luminosity.
      Water-resistant up to 600 metres (2,000ft), the fluid contours of the Trident case, which also incorporates an automatic helium release valve, surround the self-winding ETA Valjoux 7750 chronograph movement. A stunning watch.
      Movement
      Developed in 1974 by movement maker, Valjoux, the 7750 has been the most widely used mechanical chronograph movement ever since.
      One of the first movements to be designed by computer, the 7750 only winds in one direction and this, combined with the heavily weighted rotor arm, gives the movement a singular sound, produces a feeling that the watch is ‘alive’ on the wrist.
      It’s a legend – and rightly so.
      Technical
      Diameter: 43mm Height: 17.10mm Case weight: 131 g Calibre: ETA 7750 Vibrations: 28.800 per hour Case: 316L Stainless steel Water resistance : 600m / 2000 ft Dial Colour: Blue Lume: SuperLuminova Strap width: 22mm Lug to Lug: 51.5mm Features
      Swiss made 25 jewel self-winding mechanical chronograph 48 hour power reserve Hour, minute, second and date calendar with 60 seconds, 30 minutes and 12 hours indication Ceramic bezel Anti-shock system Elabore finish with Cotes de Geneve 43mm marine grade stainless steel case Water resistant to 600m/ 2000ft Screw-down deep-stamped 3D back plate Screw-in crown and chronograph pushers Integrated automatic helium release valve Unique engraved serial number Anti-reflective sapphire crystal SuperLuminova indices and diamond faceted hands Breathing regulator inspired small second disk Deep blue and yellow guilloche wave pattern dial Signature Trident counter-balance Marine-grade stainless steel bracelet with micro-adjustable ratchet clasp Presentation case and owner’s handbook










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